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Bill would give break to some young sex offenders

May 8, 2013


By LAUREN GAMBINO
Of the Associated Press

SALEM — Some young offenders convicted of having sex with underage partners would be able to request the crime be removed from their records under a bill narrowly passed by the Oregon House on Wednesday.

Voting 31 to 27, the House sent the bill to the Senate with little discussion.

Under the bill, in order for adult offenders to apply to have their records erased, coercion or force could not have been used in the sex act. Other conditions include completion of all required court-ordered programs and treatments.

Proponents say the current punishment for such sex offenders does not fit the crime. Opponents say people convicted of sex crimes often reoffend and should not be able to have their records expunged.

“Individuals who commit sex offenses ... this isn't their first time and it won't be their last,” said Crook County District Attorney Daina Vitolins, who opposes the bill on behalf of the Oregon District Attorneys Association.

To say an act is consensual when it involves a person who is too young to give consent is indefensible and minimizes the law, Vitolins said.

The age of consent in Oregon is 18.

For offenders to have their records cleared under the proposed law, they could be no more than five years older than the victim, and the victim must be at least 14. For sex crimes committed by a minor, the victim must be at least 12 and the age difference can be no more than three years.

House Speaker Tina Kotek, a sponsor, brought the legislation forward after hearing from a constituent who was 14 when his friend's parents reported him to the authorities for engaging in inappropriate behavior — which did not involve intercourse — with their young daughter.

“This is the difference between a life of hopelessness and a future for this individual,” the Portland Democrat told lawmakers last month.

Among those testifying for the bill was Matthew Shettles, who served three years’ probation on a charge of sex abuse for having sex with his girlfriend in 2004 on the night of his high school graduation.

In written testimony, Shettles said he had just turned 18 at the time and she was five weeks shy of 15. A counselor learned of the encounter and was required by a mandatory reporting law to inform authorities, he said.

He said having a sex crime on his record has made it difficult to get hired and rent an apartment. Employers and housing agencies often run criminal background checks.

“It doesn't seem reasonable that a guy who had sex with his girlfriend should have to pay for the rest of his life,” Shettles said in the written testimony.

Under the bill, only sex crimes that meet a specific set of requirements could be erased from an offender's record.

Among other things, the person must have successfully applied to be removed from the state's sex offender registry and cannot have been convicted of other serious crimes.

In 2007, the Legislature eased the requirement of lifetime sex-offender registration for young people who have consensual sex with teenagers.

To be erased from the sex offender registry, the crime must have been illegal only because the victim was underage. And, among other things, the victim must have been at least 14 and the offender could be no more than five years older.

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